CDC Expects 2020 Outbreak of Life-Threatening Acute Flaccid Myelitis
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Doctors urged to quickly recognize symptoms and to hospitalize patients immediately

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) anticipates that 2020 will be another peak year for cases of acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), an uncommon but serious neurologic condition that affects mostly children. The disease has peaked every two years between August and November in the United States since 2014. Enteroviruses, particularly enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68), are likely responsible for these peaks in cases.

CDC released a new CDC Vital Signs report to alert health care providers to a possible outbreak this year. This Vital Signs report reveals a delay in care for some patients in 2018: 35% of patients were not hospitalized until two or more days after limb weakness. AFM can progress rapidly over the course of hours or days, leading to permanent paralysis and/or the life-threatening complication of respiratory failure in previously healthy patients, so delays in care can be serious.

This Vital Signs report is intended to provide an anticipatory alert as we prepare for a possible outbreak this year.

Parents and doctors should suspect AFM in patients with sudden limb weakness, especially during August through November. Recent respiratory illness or fever and the presence of neck or back pain or any neurologic symptom should heighten their concern.

Pediatricians and frontline providers in emergency departments and urgent care centers should be prepared to quickly recognize symptoms of AFM and immediately hospitalize patients. Timing is critical at each step—prompt AFM recognition leads to optimal medical management and early specimen collection. When health care providers recognize symptoms as soon as possible, there is a better chance of detecting the cause of AFM, which might help predict the outcome. Other laboratory tests and an MRI of the brain and spinal cord can distinguish AFM from other conditions with limb weakness.

Robert Redfield, M.D., CDC Director
“As we head into these critical next months, CDC is taking necessary steps to help clinicians better recognize signs and symptoms of AFM in children,” said CDC Director Robert Redfield, M.D. “Recognition and early diagnosis are critical. CDC and public health partners have strengthened early disease detection systems, a vital step toward rapid treatment and rehabilitation for children with AFM.”

AFM is a medical emergency and patients should seek immediate medical care, even in areas with high COVID-19 activity. It is not known how the COVID-19 pandemic and the social distancing measures may affect the circulation of viruses that can cause AFM, or if COVID-19 will impact the health care system’s ability to promptly recognize and respond to AFM. If social distancing measures decrease circulation of enteroviruses this year, AFM cases may be fewer than expected or the outbreak may be delayed.

Thomas Clark, M.D., Deputy Director of CDC’s Division of Viral Diseases
“All clinicians should remain vigilant for AFM and promptly evaluate patients,” said Thomas Clark, M.D., deputy director of CDC’s Division of Viral Diseases. “During the COVID-19 pandemic, this may require adjusting practices to perform clinical evaluations of patients by phone or telemedicine. However, clinicians should not delay hospitalizing patients when they suspect AFM.”

Closer Review of AFM Peak in 2018

This Vital Signs report provides a more detailed view of clinical characteristics of AFM, which can help clinicians better recognize signs and symptoms, evaluate patients, and provide optimal medical management and rehabilitation.

The third and largest peak of AFM occurred in 2018, with 238 cases in 42 states. CDC reviewed the medical charts of AFM patients to collect more detailed information about their symptoms, exam, laboratory, and MRI findings, and where and when they sought medical care.

CDC’s review showed that in 2018:

  • 76% sought medical care within one day, 64% presented to the emergency department
  • 98% of patients with AFM were hospitalized
  • 54% of patients were admitted to an intensive care unit; 1 in 4 hospitalized patients needed mechanical ventilation to help them breathe

Most cases were in children (94%) and most patients (86%) had AFM onset during August through November. Most patients had a fever and/or respiratory illness approximately six days before limb weakness onset. Other common early symptoms were difficulty walking, neck or back pain, fever, and limb pain.

While most patients were hospitalized within one day of limb weakness onset, 25% were not hospitalized until two to three days after, and 10% were not hospitalized until four or more days after their limb weakness began This could indicate delays in recognition and presents an opportunity for improvement.

CDC Expects 2020 Outbreak of Life-Threatening Acute Flaccid Myelitis

CDC began surveillance for AFM in the United States in 2014, when the nation experienced the first peak of 120 cases, followed by peaks in 2016 (153 cases) and 2018 (238). Enteroviruses, particularly enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68), are likely responsible for these peaks in cases. EV-D68 is the most common virus identified among specimens collected from patients with AFM. However, other viruses can cause AFM and may also be contributing to the biennial peaks. Although AFM symptoms resemble those of polio, all specimens have tested negative for poliovirus. There is currently no specific test, proven treatment or prevention method for AFM.

To read more about the Nationwide Outbreak of Acute Flaccid Myelitis—United States, 2018 and the entire Vital Signs report, visit www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns.

For more information about AFM, visit: www.cdc.gov/acute-flaccid-myelitis/

About Vital Signs

Vital Signs is a report that appears as part of the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Vital Signs provides the latest data and information on key health threats. Previous topics have included cancer, HIV/AIDS, prescription drug overdoses, antibiotic resistance, suicides, asthma, and global health.

Parts Of NH Now Under Tropical Storm Warning
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CONCORD, N.H. – The National Weather Service (NWS) National Hurricane Center (NHC) issued a Tropical Storm Warning for parts of Hillsborough, Cheshire, Belknap, Rockingham, Strafford, and Merrimack counties until further notice. A Tropical Storm Warning means storm-force sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph are expected within the next 36 hours.

The rest of New Hampshire remains in a Tropical Storm Watch, meaning storm-force winds are possible.

The latest forecast calls for heavy rain and potentially strong wind gusts to begin Tuesday afternoon with greatest impact into Tuesday night through Wednesday morning.

Widespread two to four inches of rainfall is possible with isolated amounts up to six inches across higher terrain leading to a potential for flash flooding. Strong gusty winds are still a threat, especially for coastal and southern areas where localized damaging winds are a possibility.

NH Homeland Security and Emergency Management encourages residents and visitors to prepare now for potential impacts from Tropical Storm Isaias.

“We are taking it seriously and you should too,” said NH Homeland Security and Emergency Management Director Jennifer Harper. “Stay informed, be prepared and be aware of your surroundings. Have a way to receive emergency warnings so you know when to take action. Sign up for NH Alerts and view preparedness information at ReadyNH.gov.”

Damage to porches, awnings, carports and sheds are possible, and unsecured lightweight objects may blow away. Trees and limbs may fall leading to downed power lines, and roads may become impassible from debris caused by downed branches. Scattered power outages are likely.

The current forecast is somewhat favorable for tornadoes.

If a flash flood warning is issued in your area, be prepared to evacuate to higher ground immediately. If a tornado warning is issued in your area, be ready to act quickly and seek safe shelter indoors. It is important to take these warnings seriously.

The core steps to preparedness are simple:

1) Stay informed – Sign up for NH Alerts to receive location-specific weather information from the National Weather Service.

2) Have a family emergency plan so your family knows where to go and who to call in an emergency.

3) Build an Emergency Kit that includes supplies for your entire family. Don’t forget supplies for your pets and hand sanitizer and masks.

Know what to do, and have the things you need to stay safe. Learn about preparedness, including signing up for NH Alerts, making a plan and building a kit at ReadyNH.gov.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: Daily Roundup for 8/3/2020
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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today continued to take action in the ongoing response to the COVID-19 pandemic:

Additional Resources:

NH DHHS COVID-19 Update – August 3, 2020
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Concord, NH – The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has issued the following update on the new coronavirus, COVID-19.

On Monday, August 3, 2020, DHHS announced 26 new positive test results for COVID-19. There have now been 6,660 cases of COVID-19 diagnosed in New Hampshire. Several cases are still under investigation. Additional information from ongoing investigations will be incorporated into future COVID-19 updates. Of those with complete information, there are four individuals under the age of 18 and the rest are adults with 38% being female and 62% being male. The new cases reside in Rockingham (10), Strafford (5), Hillsborough County other than Manchester and Nashua (3), and Cheshire (2) counties, and in the cities of Manchester (2) and Nashua (3). The county of residence is being determined for one new case.

One new hospitalized case was identified for a total of 697 (10%) of 6,660 cases. Six of the new cases had no identified risk factors. Community-based transmission continues to occur in the State and has been identified in all counties. Most of the remaining cases have either had close contact with a person with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis or have recently traveled.

Current Situation in New Hampshire

New Hampshire 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary Report
(data updated August 3, 2020, 9:00 AM)

NH Persons with COVID-191

6,660

Recovered

5,848 (88%)

Deaths Attributed to COVID-19

417 (6%)

Total Current COVID-19 Cases

395

Persons Who Have Been Hospitalized for COVID-19

697 (10%)

Current Hospitalizations

23

Total Persons Tested at Selected Laboratories, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)2

164,836

Total Persons Tested at Selected Laboratories, Antibody Laboratory Tests2

27,314

Persons with Specimens Submitted to NH PHL

36,912

Persons with Test Pending at NH PHL3

28

Persons Being Monitored in NH (approximate point in time)

3,025

1Includes specimens positive at any laboratory and those confirmed by CDC confirmatory testing.

2Includes specimens tested at the NH Public Health Laboratories (PHL), LabCorp, Quest, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, and those sent to CDC prior to NH PHL testing capacity.

3Includes specimens received and awaiting testing at NH PHL. Does not include tests pending at commercial laboratories.

Number of Tests Conducted by Date of Report to NH DHHS

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Tests

Testing Laboratory

7/27

7/28

7/29

7/30

7/31

8/1

8/2

Daily Average

NH Public Health Laboratories

53

279

532

501

666

478

422

419

LabCorp

628

138

689

205

109

720

636

446

Quest Diagnostics

541

1,158

678

898

964

1,199

1,002

920

Mako Medical

1,383

646

391

61

57

54

4

371

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

42

224

258

175

257

232

66

179

Other NH Hospital Laboratory

146

133

119

78

115

106

113

116

Other Laboratory*

50

6

49

37

3

57

73

39

Total

2,843

2,584

2,716

1,955

2,171

2,846

2,316

2,490

Antibody Laboratory Tests

Testing Laboratory

7/27

7/28

7/29

7/30

7/31

8/1

8/2

Daily Average

LabCorp

6

9

15

22

11

11

8

12

Quest Diagnostics

39

126

121

89

113

128

43

94

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

16

20

13

16

18

5

0

13

Other Laboratory*

6

2

11

16

0

12

0

7

Total

67

157

160

143

142

156

51

125

* Includes out-of-state public health laboratories, out-of-state hospital laboratories, and other commercial laboratories not listed in the above table.

NH DHHS Daily Update on COVID-19 Archive

For more information, please visit the DHHS COVID-19 webpage at https://www.nh.gov/covid19.

Extreme Risk Protection Orders Sent to Governor
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CONCORD - Today, HB 687, a bill establishing a procedure for issuing extreme risk protection orders to protect against persons who pose an immediate risk of harm to themselves or others, was signed by the Senate President. It will next be delivered to the Secretary of State before heading to the governor’s desk where he will have five business days to sign, veto, or allow the bill to become law without his signature.

Senator Martha Hennessey (D-Hanover) issued the following statement in response:

“Extreme Risk Protection Orders (ERPO) laws are a public health and safety measure. In 2018, a CDC report identified New Hampshire as having the third highest increase in suicide deaths nationwide. It is the second leading cause of death in people under the age of 24 and accounts for 90% of gun deaths here in New Hampshire. This cannot continue.

HB 687 creates due process that gives concerned family members and law enforcement the tools to request assistance from our courts in protecting someone who may be a danger to themselves and others. I urge Governor Sununu to lend his support to this life saving legislation and sign HB 687 into law.”

NWS Issues Tropical Storm Watch for All of NH
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CONCORD, N.H. – The National Weather Service (NWS) National Hurricane Center (NHC) issued a Tropical Storm Watch for the entire state until further notice. A Tropical Storm Watch means tropical storm-force winds, sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph, are possible within the next 48 hours.

Remember, tropical storms are not just a threat to coastal communities. High winds, heavy rainfall, tornadoes, and flooding can occur anywhere in New Hampshire.

The latest forecast calls for heavy rain and potentially strong wind gusts to begin Tuesday afternoon with greatest impact into Tuesday night through Wednesday morning.

Widespread two to four inches of rainfall is possible with isolated amounts up to six inches across higher terrain leading to a potential for flash flooding. Strong gusty winds are still a threat, especially for coastal and southern areas where localized damaging winds are a possibility.

NH Homeland Security and Emergency Management encourages residents and visitors to prepare now for potential impacts from Tropical Storm Isaias.

"Being prepared is critically important,” said NH Homeland Security and Emergency Management Director Jennifer Harper. “We encourage everyone to stay informed, have a plan and make a kit including hand sanitizer and extra face coverings. Don’t forget to charge your cell phones. Preparedness information is available at ReadyNH.gov.”

The core steps to preparedness are simple:

1) Stay informed – Sign up for NH Alerts to receive location-specific weather information from the National Weather Service.

2) Have a family emergency plan so your family knows where to go and who to call in an emergency.

3) Build an Emergency Kit that includes supplies for your entire family. Don’t forget supplies for your pets and hand sanitizer and masks.

Know what to do, and have the things you need to stay safe. Learn about preparedness, including signing up for NH Alerts, making a plan and building a kit at ReadyNH.gov.

Students Call on Messner to Shut Down Scam Foundation & Donate Remaining Balance To Legitimate Charities
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Concord, NH and Denver, CO -- Today, students from New Hampshire, Colorado, and across the United States are demanding that Republican U.S. Senate candidate Corky Messner dissolve the phony Messner Foundation and donate its entire remaining balance to a real foundation, following a shocking report from the Washington Post. As reported by the Washington Post, Messner has been using his foundation to exploit low-income students to boost his public image by promising to provide scholarships, but then awarding just one student anything in ten years.

In the letter, signed by the College Democrats of America, College Democrats of New Hampshire, High School Democrats of Colorado, and the chairs of the High School Democrats of America and the New Hampshire High School Democrats, students note that Messner “raised hundreds of thousands of dollars telling donors they were helping provide higher education scholarships to low-income students, soliciting untold numbers of scholarship applications from students in need, and then spending most of the money [Messner] raised to boost [his] own image and to publicize [his] Colorado law firm” saying he “took advantage of the college-affordability crisis, all to further [his] own image.”

The letter continues by highlighting how Messner “victimized unsuspecting students, advertising the Messner Foundation scholarship to many high schools as if [he] and [his] foundation would actually help their students,” and concludes by calling on Messner to “immediately shut down the Messner Foundation and donate its remaining assets to a real foundation that is actually helping low-income students attend higher education.

The full text of the letter is available below, which the coalition of students sent to the Messner campaign earlier this morning.

August 3, 2020

To: Bryant “Corky” Messner

RE: Making things right with the students you defrauded

An explosive new report from the Washington Post has exposed how, for more than a decade, you used a nonprofit foundation to deceive vulnerable, hard-working students and defraud the foundation’s donors. According to the report, you raised hundreds of thousands of dollars telling donors they were helping provide higher education scholarships to low-income students, soliciting untold numbers of scholarship applications from students in need, and then spending most of the money you raised to boost your own image and to publicize your Colorado law firm.

That’s wrong, unethical, and unforgivable. And it’s even more disturbing to learn you have been using this foundation to advance your campaign for the U.S. Senate in New Hampshire, citing the Messner Foundation in your announcement, your campaign literature, and on the campaign trail. For your deception, the Washington Post said you earned “Four Pinocchios” or a “whopper.”

Students across the country, from Manchester, New Hampshire, all the way to your hometown in Denver, Colorado, are saddled with hundreds of thousands of dollars in student debt. We take on this burden because education is key to a brighter future. By standing up a fake vanity foundation and claiming it would provide many low-income students, who already have so many extra challenges to overcome, with scholarships, you took advantage of the college-affordability crisis, all to further your own image.

Equally problematic is the way you victimized unsuspecting students, advertising the Messner Foundation scholarship to many high schools as if you and your foundation would actually help their students. The fact that you asked these students to spend hours and hours writing essays for a scholarship that you never intended to provide shows you are both out-of-touch with the financial challenges facing today’s students and completely without the moral compass that would prevent such fraud.

Using a nonprofit foundation purportedly aimed at helping low-income students for your own personal and political gain is unforgivable. It’s equally dishonest for you to then move across the country and use that foundation to campaign for the U.S. Senate.

In light of this deception, we are requesting that you immediately shut down the Messner Foundation and donate its remaining assets to a real foundation that is actually helping low-income students attend higher education.

Sincerely,

Student Leaders of New Hampshire, Colorado, and America

College Democrats of America

New Hampshire College Democrats

Colorado High School Democrats

Asma Akbar, Chair, New Hampshire High School Democrats

Charlotte Kerpen, National Chair, High School Democrats of America

NH DHHS COVID-19 Update – August 2, 2020
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Concord, NH – The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has issued the following update on the new coronavirus, COVID-19.

On Sunday, August 2, 2020, DHHS announced 21 new positive test results for COVID-19. There have now been 6,634 cases of COVID-19 diagnosed in New Hampshire. Several cases are still under investigation. Additional information from ongoing investigations will be incorporated into future COVID-19 updates. Of those with complete information, there are two individuals under the age of 18 and the rest are adults with 62% being female and 38% being male. The new cases reside in Belknap (4), Rockingham (4), Hillsborough County other than Manchester and Nashua (3), and Strafford (2) counties, and in the cities of Manchester (4) and Nashua (4).

One new hospitalized case was identified for a total of 696 (10%) of 6,634 cases. Six of the new cases had no identified risk factors. Community-based transmission continues to occur in the State and has been identified in all counties. Most of the remaining cases have either had close contact with a person with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis or have recently traveled.

DHHS has also announced one additional death related to COVID-19. We offer our sympathies to the family and friends.

· 1 male resident of Hillsborough County, 60 years of age and older

Current Situation in New Hampshire

New Hampshire 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary Report
(data updated August 2, 2020, 9:00 AM)

NH Persons with COVID-191

6,634

Recovered

5,820 (88%)

Deaths Attributed to COVID-19

417 (6%)

Total Current COVID-19 Cases

397

Persons Who Have Been Hospitalized for COVID-19

696 (10%)

Current Hospitalizations

24

Total Persons Tested at Selected Laboratories, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)2

162,622

Total Persons Tested at Selected Laboratories, Antibody Laboratory Tests2

27,251

Persons with Specimens Submitted to NH PHL

36,882

Persons with Test Pending at NH PHL3

344

Persons Being Monitored in NH (approximate point in time)

3,025

1Includes specimens positive at any laboratory and those confirmed by CDC confirmatory testing.

2Includes specimens tested at the NH Public Health Laboratories (PHL), LabCorp, Quest, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, and those sent to CDC prior to NH PHL testing capacity.

3Includes specimens received and awaiting testing at NH PHL. Does not include tests pending at commercial laboratories.

Number of Tests Conducted by Date of Report to NH DHHS

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Tests

Testing Laboratory

7/26

7/27

7/28

7/29

7/30

7/31

8/1

Daily Average

NH Public Health Laboratories

451

53

279

532

501

666

478

423

LabCorp

534

628

138

689

205

109

386

384

Quest Diagnostics

716

541

1,158

678

898

964

1,183

877

Mako Medical

395

1,383

646

391

61

57

54

427

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

127

42

224

258

175

257

0

155

Other NH Hospital Laboratory

106

146

133

118

77

115

49

106

Other Laboratory*

28

50

6

49

37

3

54

32

Total

2,357

2,843

2,584

2,715

1,954

2,171

2,204

2,404

Antibody Laboratory Tests

Testing Laboratory

7/26

7/27

7/28

7/29

7/30

7/31

8/1

Daily Average

LabCorp

10

6

9

15

22

10

0

10

Quest Diagnostics

27

39

126

121

89

113

126

92

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

1

16

20

13

16

18

1

12

Other Laboratory*

0

6

2

11

16

0

12

7

Total

38

67

157

160

143

141

139

121

* Includes out-of-state public health laboratories, out-of-state hospital laboratories, and other commercial laboratories not listed in the above table.

NH DHHS Daily Update on COVID-19 Archive

For more information, please visit the DHHS COVID-19 webpage at https://www.nh.gov/covid19.

NH Prepares as Tropical Storm Isaias Approaches East Coast
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CONCORD, N.H. – NH Homeland Security and Emergency Management encourages residents and visitors to prepare now for potential impacts from Tropical Storm Isaias.

NH Homeland Security and Emergency Management is closely monitoring the storm with our partners at the National Weather Service.

Although it is still too early to know with certainty how this storm will affect New Hampshire, everyone can take steps to be prepared. Right now, it looks like a weak tropical storm may impact New Hampshire late Tuesday into Wednesday with heavy rainfall and gusty winds possible.

Remember, hurricanes and tropical storms are not just a threat to coastal communities. High winds, heavy rainfall, tornadoes, and flooding can occur anywhere in New Hampshire.

"Being prepared is critically important,” said NH Homeland Security and Emergency Management Director Jennifer Harper. “It is important to understand that it only takes one hurricane or tropical storm to severely impact an area. Take time now to prepare your family. Know what to do and have the things you need to stay safe.”

The core steps to preparedness are simple:

1) Stay informed – Sign up for NH Alerts.

2) Have a family emergency plan.

3) Build an Emergency Kit.

Know what to do, and have the things you need to stay safe. Learn about preparedness, including signing up for NH Alerts, making a plan and building a kit at ReadyNH.gov.

NH DHHS COVID-19 Update – August 1, 2020
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Concord, NH – The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has issued the following update on the new coronavirus, COVID-19.

On Saturday, August 1, 2020, DHHS announced 35 new positive test results for COVID-19. There have now been 6,613 cases of COVID-19 diagnosed in New Hampshire. Several cases are still under investigation. Additional information from ongoing investigations will be incorporated into future COVID-19 updates. Of those with complete information, there are four individuals under the age of 18 and the rest are adults with 57% being female and 43% being male. The new cases reside in Rockingham (7), Cheshire (5), Hillsborough County other than Manchester and Nashua (3), Strafford (3), Carroll (2), Merrimack (2), Belknap (1), and Sullivan (1) counties, and in the cities of Manchester (6) and Nashua (5).

Two new hospitalized cases were identified for a total of 695 (11%) of 6,613 cases. Two of the new cases had no identified risk factors. Community-based transmission continues to occur in the State and has been identified in all counties. Most of the remaining cases have either had close contact with a person with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis or have recently traveled.

DHHS has also announced one additional death related to COVID-19. We offer our sympathies to the family and friends.

  • 1 female resident of Hillsborough County, 60 years of age and older

Current Situation in New Hampshire

New Hampshire 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary Report
(data updated August 1, 2020, 9:00 AM)

NH Persons with COVID-191

6,613

Recovered

5,794 (88%)

Deaths Attributed to COVID-19

416 (6%)

Total Current COVID-19 Cases

403

Persons Who Have Been Hospitalized for COVID-19

695 (11%)

Current Hospitalizations

22

Total Persons Tested at Selected Laboratories, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)2

160,962

Total Persons Tested at Selected Laboratories, Antibody Laboratory Tests2

27,088

Persons with Specimens Submitted to NH PHL

36,754

Persons with Test Pending at NH PHL3

663

Persons Being Monitored in NH (approximate point in time)

3,025

1Includes specimens positive at any laboratory and those confirmed by CDC confirmatory testing.

2Includes specimens tested at the NH Public Health Laboratories (PHL), LabCorp, Quest, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, and those sent to CDC prior to NH PHL testing capacity.

3Includes specimens received and awaiting testing at NH PHL. Does not include tests pending at commercial laboratories.

Number of Tests Conducted by Date of Report to NH DHHS

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Tests

Testing Laboratory

7/25

7/26

7/27

7/28

7/29

7/30

7/31

Daily Average

NH Public Health Laboratories

267

451

53

279

532

501

666

393

LabCorp

762

534

628

138

689

205

49

429

Quest Diagnostics

205

716

540

1,158

678

898

949

735

Mako Medical

591

395

1,383

646

391

61

57

503

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

137

127

42

224

258

175

5

138

Other NH Hospital Laboratory

77

106

146

133

118

77

53

101

Other Laboratory*

36

28

50

7

49

37

3

30

Total

2,075

2,357

2,842

2,585

2,715

1,954

1,782

2,330

Antibody Laboratory Tests

Testing Laboratory

7/25

7/26

7/27

7/28

7/29

7/30

7/31

Daily Average

LabCorp

12

10

6

9

15

22

0

11

Quest Diagnostics

112

27

39

126

121

89

109

89

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

21

1

16

20

13

16

2

13

Other Laboratory*

12

0

6

2

11

16

0

7

Total

157

38

67

157

160

143

111

119

* Includes out-of-state public health laboratories, out-of-state hospital laboratories, and other commercial laboratories not listed in the above table.

NH DHHS Daily Update on COVID-19 Archive

For more information, please visit the DHHS COVID-19 webpage at https://www.nh.gov/covid19.