Governor Sununu Vetoes Medical Monitoring
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CONCORD - Today, Governor Sununu vetoed HB 1375, a bill to establish the elements of a claim for medical monitoring and the damages that may be awarded.

Senator Shannon Chandley (D-Amherst) issued the following statement in response:

“As a state, we have taken significant steps to address the public health consequences caused by the contamination of our drinking and waste water by PFAS (perfluoroalkyl substances). However, while we continue our remediation efforts, we cannot forget that there are Granite Staters who have already been exposed to contamination and have developed the subsequent long-term health complications. HB 1375 would have given individuals who have been exposed to harmful chemicals due to the negligence of a third party, including PFAS or any other hazardous or toxic substance, the proper tools to monitor and address long-term health impacts. I am disappointed that Governor Sununu has vetoed this crucial legislation.”

Governor Sununu Vetoes Reproductive Health Parity Act of 2020
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CONCORD - Today, Governor Sununu vetoed HB 685, the Reproductive Health Parity Act of 2020, which would have ensured affordable access to safe, legal abortion by requiring insurance plans that cover maternity benefits to provide coverage for emergency or elective abortion services.

Senator Cindy Rosenwald (D-Nashua) issued the following statement in response:

“While Chris Sununu claims to be ‘pro-choice,’ his actions speak louder - and truer - than words. Five years ago this week, then Executive Councilor Sununu cast the deciding vote to defund Planned Parenthood health centers and jeopardize access to health care for thousands of Granite Staters. And today, Governor Sununu vetoed the Reproductive Health Parity Act - a bill to ensure affordable access to safe, legal abortion for Granite Staters - making clear once and for all that Chris Sununu does not support reproductive rights.”

Governor Chris Sununu Vetoes HB 687
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Concord, NH - Today, Governor Chris Sununu vetoed HB 687, relative to extreme risk protection orders.

A copy of the Governor's veto message can be found here.

Governor Chris Sununu Vetoes HB 685
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Concord, NH - Today, Governor Chris Sununu vetoed HB 685, relative to insurance plans that cover maternity benefits.

A copy of the Governor's veto message can be found here.

Governor Chris Sununu Vetoes HB 1375
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Concord, NH - Today, Governor Chris Sununu vetoed HB 1375, relative to claims for medical monitoring.

A copy of the Governor's veto message can be found here.

Governor Chris Sununu Vetoes HB 1494
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Concord, NH - Today, Governor Chris Sununu vetoed HB 1494, adopting omnibus legislation concerning workers.

A copy of the Governor's veto message can be found here.

Be Safe When Enjoying New Hampshire Waters
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CONCORD, N.H. – With municipal pools and public beaches limiting capacity to facilitate social distancing during the COVID-19 public health emergency, many people are seeking relief from the summer heat in more remote swimming locations, which are not monitored by lifeguards. The New Hampshire Department of Safety Division of State Police Marine Patrol Unit, the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department, the New Hampshire Department of Natural and Cultural Resources and local safety officials are urging residents and visitors to exercise extreme caution while swimming in, or recreating around, any of the Granite State’s many waterbodies.

“Drownings are preventable tragedies. Know the risk and take appropriate safety measures when enjoying New Hampshire waterways,” said NH Department of Safety Commissioner Robert Quinn. “No family deserves to go through the sorrow of losing a loved one, especially when it could have been prevented by taking standard water safety precautions.”

“Due to the ongoing health pandemic, we’ve seen a great increase in the number of people going outside to recreate, and that’s great,” said NH Fish and Game Law Enforcement Chief, Colonel Kevin Jordan. “Our concern is that everyone goes home at night to their families. It is very important when you decide to go swimming that you know exactly where you are in case you need to call for help. Knowing exactly where you are helps rescuers get to you faster.”

“Summer weather draws people to New Hampshire for our beautiful lakes, rivers and the ocean,” said NH State Police Colonel Nathan Noyes. “Swim in areas with lifeguards whenever possible. Always swim with a friend, wear life jackets, know your own swimming ability, and know your surroundings. Never mix alcohol and drugs with water and boating activities.”

“This season with more intense rip currents, the New Hampshire State Park’s lifeguards have had some busy days,” said NH Department of Natural and Cultural Resources Commissioner Sarah Stewart. “It’s important to understand that parents are the first line of defense for children. Never leave children unattended in the water—not even for a minute. If your child is in the water, you should be too. Accidents can happen very quickly.”

“Water safety is a consideration for everybody; your life depends on it,” said Concord NH Fire Department Battalion Chief Derek Kelleher. “Remember, rivers are very unpredictable. The flow and speed is faster and stronger than you think. Consider learning lifesaving skills that may make a difference, including learning how to swim and how to perform CPR.”

New Hampshire averages 13-15 drownings every year. So far this year, New Hampshire has had seven drownings. Know the risks and take precautions before enjoying New Hampshire’s beautiful waterways.

State and local officials offer these water safety recommendations:

· Never swim alone, always bring a friend.

· Swim in areas with lifeguards whenever possible.

· Always wear a personal flotation device (PFD) or life jacket whether recreating from a boat, along shore, or in the water.

· Know the conditions prior to heading out.

· Know where you will be swimming and the name of the area in case you need to call for help.

· Always tell someone where you are going and when you will return.

· Stay alert and be aware of what is going on around you.

· Always call 9-1-1 to report emergencies.

NH Department of Safety Commission Robert Quinn

NH Fish and Game Department Law Enforcement Chief Colonel Kevin Jordan

NH Department of Safety, Division of State Police Colonel Nathan Noyes

NH Department of Natural and Cultural Resources Commissioner Sarah Stewart

Concord NH Fire Department Battalion Chief Derek Kelleher

DHHS Identifies Second Jamestown Canyon Virus Case of the 2020 Arboviral Season in New Hampshire
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Concord, NH – The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Division of Public Health Services (DPHS) is announcing that an adult from Bow, NH, tested positive for Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV). The person was not hospitalized and is doing well, but experienced fever and mild neurological symptoms. This is the second detection of JCV in the State this year. JCV is transmitted by the bite of an infected mosquito. There are no vaccines to prevent JCV and treatment consists of supportive care.

The arboviral risk level for Bow will be increased to high. The arboviral risk level indicates the risk of transmission of these infections to people from mosquitoes. The surrounding towns of Goffstown, Dunbarton, Hopkinton, and Allenstown will increase to moderate. The risk level for the surrounding towns of Hooksett, Pembroke and Concord will remain moderate.

“Jamestown Canyon Virus is one of three different infections that can be transmitted through the bite of a mosquito in New Hampshire,” said Dr. Benjamin Chan, NH State Epidemiologist. “This is the second infection identified in NH this year, and the risk for mosquito-transmitted infections will only increase through the summer and fall until there is a mosquito-killing hard frost. New Hampshire residents and visitors need to continue to take steps to protect themselves from mosquito bites.”

Jamestown Canyon virus is a mosquito-borne pathogen that circulates widely in North America primarily between deer and mosquitoes but can also infect humans. Reports in humans have been increasing over the last several years as recognition and testing for this virus has increased. This is New Hampshire’s eleventh case of JCV since the first report of the disease in the State in 2013. Many illnesses caused by JCV are mild, but moderate-to-severe central nervous system involvement requiring hospitalization have been reported, including fatal infections.

In addition to JCV, risk for infection in NH by Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus (EEEV) and West Nile Virus (WNV) will continue to increase through the summer and fall until mosquitoes are no longer biting. Residents of and visitors to New Hampshire should continue to protect themselves and their family members. Prevention guidelines are included below.

People can be infected and not develop any symptoms, or only develop very mild symptoms for all of the mosquito-borne diseases present in New Hampshire. Early symptoms can include fever, muscle aches, headaches, and fatigue. More serious central nervous system disease, including meningitis or encephalitis can occur with these diseases. If you or someone you know is experiencing symptoms, including fever and headache, contact your local medical provider.

Anyone with questions about vector-borne illnesses can call the DPHS Bureau of Infectious Disease Control at (603) 271-4496 from 8 AM to 4:30 PM, Monday through Friday. More information can also be found online at www.dhhs.nh.gov and www.cdc.gov.

Prevention Guidelines for Mosquito and Tick Diseases

NH Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Public Health Services

1. Eliminate habitat and breeding locations.

Mosquitoes

· Mosquitoes lay their eggs in standing water. Remove outdoor items that hold water (old tires, cans, plastic containers, ceramic pots).

· Drill holes in the bottom of outdoor recycling containers, clean roof gutters and ensure proper drainage.

· If not in use, empty and/or cover swimming pools, wading pools and hot tubs.

· Turn over wheelbarrows and change water in birdbaths at least twice weekly.

Ticks

· Minimizing areas where hosts for the ticks, such as rodents and deer, can congregate to eat, sleep or feed.

2. Be aware of where mosquitoes and ticks live.

· Weeds, tall grass, and bushes provide an outdoor home for mosquitoes and ticks, alike.

· Make sure that doors and windows have tight-fitting screens. Repair or replace all screens in your home that have tears or holes.

· Resting mosquitoes can often be flushed from indoor resting sites by using sweeping motions under beds, behind bedside tables etc. and once in flight, exterminated prior to sleeping at night.

· Avoid tick-infested areas. If in tick-infested areas, walk in the center of trails to avoid contact with overgrown grass, brush, and leaf litter at trail edges.

3. Protect yourself from bites.

· When outside, wear protective clothing such as socks, long-sleeved shirts, and long pants (preferably tucked in socks). Light-colored clothing helps you spot ticks.

· Wear insect repellents, such as one containing 30% or less DEET (N,N-diethyl-methyl-meta-toluamide), Picaridin, para-menthane-diol, IR3535, or 2-undecanone or oil of lemon eucalyptus.

o Treat clothing with permethrin, ideal for hunters as it is odorless when dry.

· Vitamin B, ultrasonic devices, incense, and bug zappers have not been shown to be effective in preventing mosquito bites.

· Shower as soon as possible after spending time outdoors.

· Check for ticks daily, on you and your pets. Ticks can hide under the armpits, behind the knees, in the hair, and in the groin.

· Wash and dry clothing after being outdoors. Tumble clothes in a dryer on high heat for 10 minutes to kill ticks on dry clothing. If the clothes are damp, additional time may be needed.

· Early removal of ticks can reduce the risk of infection. Inspect all body surfaces carefully, and remove attached ticks with tweezers. Monitor your health closely after a tick bite and be alert for symptoms of illness. Contact your physician to discuss testing and treatment.

For more information on mosquito-borne diseases, visit the DHHS Website at www.dhhs.nh.gov.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: Daily Roundup for 8/6/2020
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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today continued to take action in the ongoing response to the COVID-19 pandemic:

  • On August 4, the FDA issued Emergency Use Authorizations (EUAs) for ventilator-related devices to:
    • Lombardi Undersea, for its Subsalve Oxygen Treatment Hood, which is a patient interface intended for helmet-based Non-Invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation, according to clinician-established protocols to treat Acute Respiratory Distress Symptoms resulting from COVID-19. The device is for use with adult patients only in Intensive Care Unit settings.
    • VORTRAN Medical Technology 1, Inc., for its VORTRAN GO2VENT with PEEP Valve, which is intended for use by properly trained personnel to deliver emergency, short term, constant-flow pressure-cycled ventilator support with patients who weigh 10kg or more.
    • Nanotronics Imaging, Inc., for its nHale device, which provides bi-level positive air pressure to support respiratory therapy of spontaneously breathing adults who weigh more than 30kg and who suffer from COVID-19 disease in traditional healthcare facilities (e.g., hospitals, assisted living facilities, nursing homes), private homes, as well as spaces converted for the care of large numbers of COVID-19 patients (e.g., convention centers, university dormitories, motels).
  • On August 5, the FDA issued a Surgical Masks Umbrella Emergency Use Authorization in response to concerns relating to insufficient supply and availability of disposable, single-use surgical masks. As explained in the EUA, surgical masks that meet specific performance requirements are authorized for use in health care settings by health care personnel as personal protective equipment to provide a physical barrier to fluids and particulate materials to prevent exposure to respiratory droplets and large particles during surgical mask shortages resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Testing updates:
    • To date, the FDA has currently authorized 204 tests under EUAs; these include 167 molecular tests, 35 antibody tests, and 2 antigen tests.

Additional Resources:

NH DHHS COVID-19 Update – August 6, 2020
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Concord, NH – The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has issued the following update on the new coronavirus, COVID-19.

On Thursday, August 6, 2020, DHHS announced 25 new positive test results for COVID-19. There have now been 6,742 cases of COVID-19 diagnosed in New Hampshire. Several cases are still under investigation. Additional information from ongoing investigations will be incorporated into future COVID-19 updates. Of those with complete information, there is one individual under the age of 18 and the rest are adults with 68% being female and 32% being male. The new cases reside in Strafford (8), Rockingham (5), Carroll (2), Cheshire (1), and Merrimack (1) counties, and in the cities of Manchester (4) and Nashua (3). The county of residence is being determined for one new case.

One new hospitalized case was identified for a total of 699 (10%) of 6,742 cases. Five of the new cases had no identified risk factors. Community-based transmission continues to occur in the State and has been identified in all counties. Most of the remaining cases have either had close contact with a person with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis or have recently traveled.

DHHS has also announced one additional death related to COVID-19. We offer our sympathies to the family and friends.

· 1 male resident of Rockingham County, 60 years of age and older

Current Situation in New Hampshire

New Hampshire 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary Report
(data updated August 6, 2020, 9:00 AM)

NH Persons with COVID-191

6,742

Recovered

5,941 (88%)

Deaths Attributed to COVID-19

419 (6%)

Total Current COVID-19 Cases

382

Persons Who Have Been Hospitalized for COVID-19

699 (10%)

Current Hospitalizations

21

Total Persons Tested at Selected Laboratories, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)2

168,465

Total Persons Tested at Selected Laboratories, Antibody Laboratory Tests2

27,611

Persons with Specimens Submitted to NH PHL

37,804

Persons with Test Pending at NH PHL3

1,093

Persons Being Monitored in NH (approximate point in time)

2,950

1Includes specimens positive at any laboratory and those confirmed by CDC confirmatory testing.

2Includes specimens tested at the NH Public Health Laboratories (PHL), LabCorp, Quest, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, and those sent to CDC prior to NH PHL testing capacity.

3Includes specimens received and awaiting testing at NH PHL. Does not include tests pending at commercial laboratories.

New Hampshire Institutions Associated with COVID-19 Outbreak (as of 8/6/2020)

Current COVID-19 Outbreaks

Resident Cases

Staff Cases

Under Investigation

Deaths

Evergreen Place Manchester

26

12

0

4

Greenbriar Nashua

123

34

0

28

Ridgewood Genesis Bedford

2

9

0

0

Closed COVID-19 Outbreaks

Resident Cases

Staff Cases

Deaths

All American Assisted Living Londonderry (6/9/2020)

15

16

2

Aurora Assisted Living Derry (6/6/2020)

38

17

10

Bedford Falls (6/6/2020)

40

21

11

Bedford Hills Center Genesis (7/16/2020)

37

25

7

Bedford Nursing and Rehabilitation Center (7/7/2020)

62

28

17

Bellamy Fields Dover (5/16/2020)

35

13

10

Birch Hill (7/28/2020)

40

29

14

Clipper Harbor Genesis Portsmouth (5/29/2020)

0

8

0

Community Bridges Belmont (6/9/2020)

2

7

0

Community Resources for Justice Transitional Housing Manchester (5/18/2020)

16

4

0

Courville Manchester (6/30/2020)

15

14

6

Crestwood Center Milford (6/30/2020)

54

28

15

Crotched Mountain (4/20/2020)

3

12

1

Easterseals - Manchester (5/16/2020)

45

70

0

Greystone Farm at Salem (6/16/2020)

9

3

0

Hackett Hill Genesis Manchester (6/5/2020)

56

16

16

Hanover Hill Manchester (5/26/2020)

79

60

25

Hillsborough County Nursing Home (7/27/2020)

154

55

39

Holy Cross Manchester (7/15/2020)

19

18

1

Huntington Nashua (5/8/2020)

23

19

7

Institute for Professional Practice, Inc (4/21/2020)

2

6

1

Kimi Nichols Center Plaistow (6/10/2020)

3

6

0

Mt. Carmel Nursing and Rehabilitation Manchester (6/26/2020)

38

16

5

Mountain Ridge Genesis Franklin (6/18/2020)

49

2

9

Ridgewood Genesis Bedford (6/18/2020)

64

23

23

Pleasant Valley Derry (5/27/2020)

87

29

21

Salemhaven (7/9/2020)

46

15

11

Salem Woods (5/18/2020)

23

26

10

Villa Crest Manchester (7/1/2020)

54

45

15



Number of Tests Conducted by Date of Report to NH DHHS

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Tests

Testing Laboratory

7/30

7/31

8/1

8/2

8/3

8/4

8/5

Daily Average

NH Public Health Laboratories

501

666

478

422

294

107

816

469

LabCorp

205

109

721

641

735

465

176

436

Quest Diagnostics

955

1,023

1,201

1,006

1,026

678

273

880

Mako Medical

61

57

54

4

1

1

25

29

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

175

257

232

66

149

177

3

151

Other NH Hospital Laboratory

78

152

128

130

154

220

101

138

Other Laboratory*

37

6

59

74