NH DHHS COVID-19 Update – April 7, 2020
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Concord, NH – The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has issued the following update on the new coronavirus, COVID-19.

 

On Tuesday, April 7, 2020, DHHS announced 32 new positive test results for COVID-19. There have now been 747 cases of COVID-19 diagnosed in New Hampshire. Several of the new cases are still under investigation. Of those with complete information, all are adults with 53% being female and 47% being male. The new cases reside in Rockingham (8), Hillsborough County other than Manchester and Nashua (6), Merrimack (4), and Belknap (3) counties, and in the cities of Manchester (7) and Nashua (3). The county of residence is being determined for one new case. Three new COVID-19-related hospitalizations were reported; thus far, 108 (14%) of the 747 positive cases have been hospitalized. Twenty-one of the new cases have no identified risk factors. Community-based transmission continues to increase in the State and has been identified in all counties with cases. Most of the remaining cases have either had travel to domestic or international locations or have had close contact with a person with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis.

 

DHHS has also announced four additional deaths related to COVID-19. These were three males and one female, all 60 years of age or older. Two were residents of Hillsborough County, one was a resident of Cheshire County, and one was a resident of Rockingham County. We offer our sympathies to the family and friends.

 

Current Situation in New Hampshire

 

County

Cases

Belknap

21

Carroll

19

Cheshire

13

Coos

1

Grafton

41

Hillsborough - Other

93

Hillsborough - Manchester

123

Hillsborough - Nashua

72

Merrimack

56

Rockingham

255

Strafford

46

Sullivan

6

County TBD

1

Grand Total

747

 

New Hampshire 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary Report
(data updated April 7, 2020, 9:00 AM)

NH Persons with COVID-191

747

Recovered

211 (28%)

Deaths Attributed to COVID-19

13 (2%)

Total Current COVID-19 Cases

523

Persons Who Have Been Hospitalized for COVID-19

108 (14%)

Persons Tested Negative at Selected Laboratories2

8,389

Persons with Specimens Submitted to NH PHL

4,312

Persons with Test Pending at NH PHL3

89

Persons Being Monitored in NH (approximate point in time)

2,200

 

1Includes specimens presumptive-positive at any laboratory and those confirmed by CDC confirmatory testing.
2Includes specimens tested at the NH Public Health Laboratories (PHL), LabCorp, Quest, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, and those sent to CDC prior to NH PHL testing capacity.

3Includes specimens received and awaiting testing at NH PHL. Does not include tests pending at commercial laboratories.

 

NH DHHS Daily Update on COVID-19 Archive

 

For more information, please visit the DHHS COVID-19 webpage at https://www.nh.gov/covid19.

The Concord DMV Will Close Wednesday for Enhanced Cleaning
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CONCORD, N.H. - The Concord Division of Motor Vehicles will be closed Wednesday, April 8, for enhanced cleaning and to allow the Department of Health and Human Services to conduct a close-contact investigation following the identification of a Concord DMV staff member who tested positive for COVID-19. The staff member does not have contact with the public during the business day. Any person who is identified as a close contact will be notified.

 

DMV phone services will not be available at any location on Wednesday, April 8. Phone services at all locations will resume on Thursday, April 9.

 

The Concord DMV is reaching out to customers to reschedule appointments and will resume appointment only and drop box services on Thursday, April 9.

 

During the closure, drop box services will be uninterrupted at Dover, Manchester, Newport, and Twin Mountain, available Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. until 4:15 p.m.

 

Customers should take advantage of the DMV’s online services, including online driver license renewal, ID renewals, and online ticket pay at www.nh.gov/dmv.

The Concord DMV Will Close Wednesday for Enhanced Cleaning
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CONCORD, N.H. - The Concord DMV will be closed Wednesday, April 8, for enhanced cleaning and to allow the Department of Health and Human Services to conduct a close-contact investigation following the identification of a Concord DMV staff member who tested positive for COVID-19. The staff member does not have contact with the public during the business day. Any person who is identified as a close contact will be notified.

The Concord DMV is reaching out to customers to reschedule appointments. The Concord DMV will resume appointment only and drop box services on Thursday, April 9.

During the closure, drop box services will be uninterrupted at Dover, Manchester, Newport, and Twin Mountain, available Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. until 4:15 p.m.

For all other transactions, please call DMV customer service at 227-4000 to determine availability of services.

Customers should take advantage of the DMV’s online services, including online driver license renewal, ID renewals, and online ticket pay at www.nh.gov/dmv.

NH DHHS COVID-19 Update – April 6, 2020
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Concord, NH – The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has issued the following update on the new coronavirus, COVID-19.

 

On Monday, April 6, 2020, DHHS announced 46 new positive test results for COVID-19. There have now been 715 cases of COVID-19 diagnosed in New Hampshire. Several of the new cases are still under investigation. Of those with complete information, there are three females and one male under the age of 18 and the rest are adults with 54% being female and 37% being male. The new cases reside in Rockingham (15), Hillsborough County other than Manchester and Nashua (4), Merrimack (6), Strafford (2), Cheshire (2), and Belknap (1) counties, and in the cities of Manchester (11) and Nashua (4). The county of residence is being determined for one new case. Nine new COVID-19-related hospitalizations were reported; thus far, 103 (14%) of the 715 positive cases have been hospitalized. Eighteen of the new cases have no identified risk factors. Community-based transmission continues to increase in the State and has been identified in all counties with cases. Most of the remaining cases have either had travel to domestic or international locations or have had close contact with a person with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis.

 

Current Situation in New Hampshire

 

County

Cases

Belknap

18

Carroll

19

Cheshire

13

Coos

1

Grafton

41

Hillsborough - Other

87

Hillsborough - Manchester

116

Hillsborough - Nashua

69

Merrimack

52

Rockingham

246

Strafford

46

Sullivan

6

County TBD

1

Grand Total

715

 

New Hampshire 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary Report
(data updated April 6, 2020, 9:00 AM)

NH Persons with COVID-191

715

Recovered

151 (21%)

Deaths Attributed to COVID-19

9 (1%)

Total Current COVID-19 Cases

555

Persons Who Have Been Hospitalized for COVID-19

103 (14%)

Persons Tested Negative at Selected Laboratories2

8,019

Persons with Specimens Submitted to NH PHL

4,183

Persons with Test Pending at NH PHL3

49

Persons Being Monitored in NH (approximate point in time)

2,250

 

1Includes specimens presumptive-positive at any laboratory and those confirmed by CDC confirmatory testing.
2Includes specimens tested at the NH Public Health Laboratories (PHL), LabCorp, Quest, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, and those sent to CDC prior to NH PHL testing capacity.

3Includes specimens received and awaiting testing at NH PHL. Does not include tests pending at commercial laboratories.

NH DHHS Daily Update on COVID-19 Archive

 

For more information, please visit the DHHS COVID-19 webpage at https://www.nh.gov/covid19.

UNH Research Looks at Role of Politics and Media in COVID-19 Pandemic
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DURHAM, N.H.—In a nationwide effort to alter behaviors and curb the spread of the coronavirus, research from the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire found a majority of Granite Staters made changes, but those who approved of President Trump’s handling of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and who regularly watch Fox News, were less likely to alter their routines due to COVID-19.

“Overall, close to 77% of New Hampshire residents made lifestyle adjustments such as leaving home less often, but this still leaves a minority that did not—and that group poses a critical challenge for efforts to slow the spread of the disease,” said Tom Safford, associate professor of sociology and Carsey faculty fellow.

The survey done in mid-March showed N.H. residents had polarized opinions about Trump’s handling of the pandemic with 40% strongly or somewhat approving and 56% strongly or somewhat disapproving reflecting general criticism of the administration which had come under fire for not following advice from scientists and medical experts in such key areas as testing, health-worker protections, medical preparations, and individual behavior.

In direct contrast, support among residents was high for Governor Sununu’s response to the COVID-19 situation with 67% strongly or somewhat approving, only 13% strongly or somewhat disapproving and 20% expressing more neutral opinions.

Despite disappointment with the Trump administration’s actions, researchers found that a large majority of New Hampshire residents, 77%, say they trust government science agencies such as the Centers for Disease Control for information about the coronavirus.

“As the COVID-19 outbreak intensifies, both information and misinformation have spread as rapidly as the virus itself with more people expressing more trust and confidence in science agencies compared with the president or government during this crisis,” said Lawrence Hamilton, professor of sociology and senior Carsey fellow.

When it came to the role media played in conveying public health recommendations, researchers found a striking 24-point gap in behavioral changes related to the frequency of watching one specific network, Fox News. Overall, 81% of those who never watched Fox News reporting major behavioral changes around the COVID-19 warnings, compared with just 57 percent of those who watch Fox News every day.

The survey was conducted by the Carsey School of Public Policy, working with UNH’s Survey Center, between March 17 and 26. Findings were based on responses by 650 NH residents that completed an online survey and were part of the Granite State Panel, an effort by the Survey Center to investigate new ways of gathering and understanding the opinion of New Hampshire residents. Granite State Panel members are recruited from randomly selected landline and cell phone numbers across New Hampshire and are sent surveys periodically. The survey was started when New Hampshire had only 17 confirmed COVID-19 cases and the U.S. total was around 22,000. On the final day of the survey period, Governor Sununu issued a stay-at-home order.

The Carsey School of Public Policy is nationally recognized for research, policy education and bringing people together for thoughtful dialogue to address important societal challenges. The school develops and facilitates innovative, responsive and equitable solutions at all levels of government and in the for-profit and nonprofit sectors.

The University of New Hampshire inspires innovation and transforms lives in our state, nation, and world. More than 16,000 students from all 50 states and 71 countries engage with an award-winning faculty in top-ranked programs in business, engineering, law, health and human services, liberal arts and the sciences across more than 200 programs of study. As one of the nation’s highest-performing research universities, UNH partners with NASA, NOAA, NSF and NIH, and receives more than $110 million in competitive external funding every year to further explore and define the frontiers of land, sea, and space.

Sanitizing N95 Masks with Alternatives Like UV Light; UNH Expert Offers Comment
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DURHAM, N.H.—As the coronavirus spreads so does the threat to medical personnel on the front lines of care. With the number of cases expected to surge in the United States and supplies of the much needed N95 masks dwindling, medical communities are desperately looking for alternative solutions for disinfecting masks that healthcare workers are being forced to reuse. As a nationally known expert in disinfectant methods, Jim Malley, professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of New Hampshire, says methods like UV light, heat & humidity and vaporized hydrogen peroxide are the best known viable practices and while they are not long-term solutions, if used correctly, they can be effective in emergency situations.

Malley can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or (603) 759-1541.

“This is a unique and challenging time and medical communities are looking beyond their normal practices to find ways to keep their staff safe while treating COVID-19 patients,” said Malley. “UV light offers a potential option that can be a safe and cost-effective way to sanitize masks, if the right amount of light, for the right length of time, is dosed by a well understood optical device.”

Malley has over 30 years of experience using chemical and physical options, in particular UV, to disinfect water, air and surfaces from bacteria, viruses, and protozoan cysts. His expertise has helped guide front line medical practitioners and first responders from Boston to Denver and beyond looking for facts on the most effective way to use the UV lights. They are being used in hospitals and hanging in ambulances so EMTs can sanitize their surfaces and implements them on the go. Malley estimates about a third of the calls he receives are from healthcare professionals in rural areas that don’t have the same resources as those in cities.

“A lot of large vaporized hydrogen peroxide systems are being set up in cities around the country to help sanitize masks but UV is a more feasible low tech and low volume option for first responders and individual healthcare workers often found in rural areas,” said Malley. “There are pros and cons to both but the need is just so great and growing every day from nursing homes to hospitals, labs, and ambulances—these disinfectant options are tools in a toolbox and right now we need to use all the tools we have.”

UV light penetrates the mask and works by damaging the molecular bonds that hold together the nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) of the viruses or bacteria and stops them from infecting and/or replicating within a human cell. The UV light used is a short wave and cannot be seen by the human eye so to effectively kill the virus requires an understanding of the irradiance—the amount of light energy or UV intensity—the length of time the mask is dosed, and knowledge of the UV optics of the disinfection device.

Malley stresses that it is important that masks are clean because any substance on the inside or the outside of the mask, even something as simple as sunscreen, cosmetics or lip balm, could block the UV light from working on a particular portion of the mask.

“In a perfect world, masks should be worn once and discarded,” said Malley. “But in a pandemic, with all the supply shortages and strains on healthcare system infection control practices, disinfection practices like heat and humidity applications), ultraviolet light and/or hydrogen peroxide vapor, offer alternative disinfectant options for PPEs.”

The University of New Hampshire inspires innovation and transforms lives in our state, nation, and world. More than 16,000 students from all 50 states and 71 countries engage with an award-winning faculty in top-ranked programs in business, engineering, law, health and human services, liberal arts and the sciences across more than 200 programs of study. As one of the nation’s highest-performing research universities, UNH partners with NASA, NOAA, NSF and NIH, and receives more than $110 million in competitive external funding every year to further explore and define the frontiers of land, sea, and space.

NH DHHS COVID-19 Update – April 5, 2020
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Concord, NH – The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has issued the following update on the new coronavirus, COVID-19.

 

On Sunday, April 5, 2020, DHHS announced 48 new positive test results for COVID-19. There have now been 669 cases of COVID-19 diagnosed in New Hampshire. Several of the new cases are still under investigation. Of those with complete information, all are adults with 40% being female and 60% being male. The new cases reside in Rockingham (16), Hillsborough County other than Manchester and Nashua (7), Merrimack (5), Strafford (1), Carroll (2), and Cheshire (1) counties, and in the cities of Nashua (6) and Manchester (4). The county of residence is being determined for six new cases. Six new COVID-19-related hospitalizations were reported; thus far, 92 (14%) of the 669 positive cases have been hospitalized. Sixteen of the new cases have no identified risk factors. Community-based transmission continues to increase in the State and has been identified in all counties with cases. Most of the remaining cases have either had travel to domestic or international locations or have had close contact with a person with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis.

 

Current Situation in New Hampshire

 

County

Cases

Belknap

17

Carroll

19

Cheshire

11

Coos

1

Grafton

41

Hillsborough - Other

82

Hillsborough - Manchester

101

Hillsborough - Nashua

66

Merrimack

45

Rockingham

230

Strafford

44

Sullivan

6

County TBD

6

Grand Total

669

New Hampshire 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary Report
(data updated April 5, 2020, 9:00 AM)

NH Persons with COVID-191

669

Recovered

147 (22%)

Deaths Attributed to COVID-19

9 (1%)

Total Current COVID-19 Cases

513

Persons Who Have Been Hospitalized for COVID-19

92 (14%)

Persons Tested Negative at Selected Laboratories2

7,701

Persons with Specimens Submitted to NH PHL

4,096

Persons with Test Pending at NH PHL3

101

Persons Being Monitored in NH (approximate point in time)

2,100

 

1Includes specimens presumptive-positive at any laboratory and those confirmed by CDC confirmatory testing.
2Includes specimens tested at the NH Public Health Laboratories (PHL), LabCorp, Quest, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, and those sent to CDC prior to NH PHL testing capacity.

3Includes specimens received and awaiting testing at NH PHL. Does not include tests pending at commercial laboratories.

NH DHHS Daily Update on COVID-19 Archive

 

For more information, please visit the DHHS COVID-19 webpage at https://www.nh.gov/covid19.

NH DHHS COVID-19 Update – April 4, 2020
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Concord, NH – The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has issued the following update on the new coronavirus, COVID-19.

On Saturday, April 4, 2020, DHHS announced 81 new positive test results for COVID-19. There have now been 621 cases of COVID-19 diagnosed in New Hampshire.

Several of the new cases are still under investigation. Future updates will include additional information from those case investigations. Of those with complete information, all are adults with 55% being female and 46% being male. The new cases reside in Rockingham (26), Hillsborough County other than Manchester and Nashua (6), Merrimack (4), Strafford (4), Belknap (3), Grafton (3), Cheshire (1), and Sullivan (1) counties, and in the cities of Manchester (23) and Nashua (7). The county of residence is being determined for three new cases. Six new COVID-19-related hospitalizations were reported; thus far, 86 (13%) of the 621 positive cases have been hospitalized. Twenty-two of the new cases have no identified risk factors. Community-based transmission continues to increase in the State and has been identified in all counties with cases. Most of the remaining cases have either had travel to domestic or international locations or have had close contact with a person with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis.

DHHS has also announced two additional deaths related to COVID-19. These were both male residents of Hillsborough County who were over 60 years old. We offer our sympathies to the family and friends.

 

 

County

Cases

Belknap

17

Carroll

17

Cheshire

10

Coos

1

Grafton

41

Hillsborough - Other

74

Hillsborough - Manchester

97

Hillsborough - Nashua

60

Merrimack

39

Rockingham

213

Strafford

43

Sullivan

6

County TBD

3

Grand Total

540


New Hampshire 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary Report
(data updated April 4, 2020, 9:00 AM)

NH Persons with COVID-191

621

Recovered

146 (27%)

Deaths Attributed to COVID-19

9 (1%)

Total Current COVID-19 Cases

466

Persons Who Have Been Hospitalized for COVID-19

86 (13%)

Persons Tested Negative at Selected Laboratories2

7,411

Persons with Specimens Submitted to NH PHL

3,955

Persons with Test Pending at NH PHL3

93

Persons Being Monitored in NH (approximate point in time)

2,000


1
Includes specimens presumptive-positive at any laboratory and those confirmed by CDC confirmatory testing.
2Includes specimens tested at the NH Public Health Laboratories (PHL), LabCorp, Quest, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, and those sent to CDC prior to NH PHL testing capacity.

3Includes specimens received and awaiting testing at NH PHL. Does not include tests pending at commercial laboratories.

NH DHHS Daily Update on COVID-19 Archive

For more information, please visit the DHHS COVID-19 webpage at https://www.nh.gov/covid19.

Barrington’s American Legion Post
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Nestled in the alcove under the Chapel of the Nativity Catholic Church at 231 Route 9, Barrington, NH 03825, is the American Legion Barrington POST 114.   POST 114 was first chartered as BARRINGTON POST 114 on 14 Aug 1990. Then it was rechartered for a name change to ROGER E. CARDEN JR. POST 114 on 13 Mar 1995. The Auxiliary was chartered on 28 April 1991 and then they were rechartered due to name change on 31 July 1991.  Presently the Post 114 has 104 members. Our all-time high was 105.

The Legion is an organization of and for military personnel who have been honorably discharged from the US military service without regard to the branch of service. The Auxiliary is an organization for and of wives, daughters, grand-daughters and mothers of American Legion members with the intention of supporting the Legion.  There is no Junior Legion but there is an individually chartered organization for the sons and grandsons of Legion members called The Sons of the American Legion. Dual membership is fairly common. A person can actually hold membership in the Legion, Sons of the American Legion and Auxiliary all at the same time. Barrington does not have a Sons of the American Legion chapter.

The American Legion, the Auxiliary and the Sons of the American Legion are chartered by Congress.

“The American Legion was chartered by Congress in 1919 as a patriotic veterans organization. Focusing on service to veterans, service members and communities, the Legion evolved from a group of war-weary veterans of World War I into one of the most influential nonprofit groups in the United States. Membership swiftly grew to over 1 million, and local posts sprang up across the country. Today, membership stands at nearly 2 million in more than 13,000 posts worldwide. The posts are organized into 55 departments: one each for the 50 states, along with the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, France, Mexico, and the Philippines.“ From History of the American Legion - https://www.legion.org/history

Women who are honorably discharged from the military are equally eligible for membership in the Legion as are the men. Prior to 2019 congress established specific “war” periods during which a person had to have served during to be eligible for membership. With passage of “The Legion Act” in 2019 Congress changed the service requirement to any federal military service during WWII and after WWII to the present. Since the passage of the Legion Act, husbands of qualified female veterans can be members of the auxiliary.

While membership is the lifeline it is not the primary emphasis of the Barrington POST 114. They would like to maintain their current membership level, but would really like to have more younger members active in the operations of the Post.

All of Post 114’s events are open to the public. The public is encouraged to attend our regular monthly meetings, special ceremonies/events like Memorial Day Parade, Veterans Day ceremony, Flag disposal ceremony and our presenting the nation's colors at events like the BYA opening Day. We also present group flag education sessions upon request. The only members-only “closed event” they have is the annual family Christmas party. Attendance, while we are providing military courtesies at funerals, is up to the family and not our responsibility.  

One of the biggest benefits to the American Legion is bonding with others. Socialization with other former military members is a strong drawing factor. Being able to continue to serve the community is like an extension of our military service time and it provides feelings of satisfaction.

Over the past twenty years the general membership has aged some. The Barrington Post is always looking for younger members to step up and take more charge in the operations.

During the past 15 years, POST 114 has been active in the Barrington community. One of the things done was to provide all the classroom and building flags prior to the opening of both the elementary and middle schools. The group still continues to provide flags to the schools and the Police/Fire/EMS complex. The Post sponsors a Cub Scout Pack in town. They recognize student accomplishments at BMS Graduation and grant scholarships each year to graduating Barrington high school students. Post 114 also provides inexpensive or free meeting space to community service groups like the Grange and the Lyons Club. There have been occasions when some town committees have utilized the space as well.  The hall is available for private rentals.

There is a real need in our area that the local American Legion Post 114 could use help with.  
Approximately 22 current and former members of the military take their own lives each and every day. Community involvement is important in trying to stem this flow. Involvement can be as easy as a donation or assisting with a fundraiser or event. 

For more information, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Oyster River High School Senior Signé Kula of Barrington Receives Full Four-Year Dorsey Scholarship to McDaniel College
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As a Dorsey ScholarSigné Kula has received McDaniel’s highest academic honor earning full scholarship, including tuition, room, and board for all four years  

 

The Dorsey Scholars Program is supported by a $6.7 million estate gift from 1891 alumnus Philip Henry Dorsey, the largest bequest for scholarships in McDaniel’s history 

 

Oyster River High School Senior Signé Kula of Barrington Receives Full Four-Year Dorsey Scholarship to McDaniel College WESTMINSTER, Md. – McDaniel College has awarded Signé Kula of Barrington (03825) a full-tuition Dorsey Scholarship. Kula is a senior at Oyster River High School in Durham.  

 

The highest academic honor at McDaniel, students selected for the Dorsey Scholars Program receive full tuition, room, and board for all four years at McDaniel College (a value of more than $200,000).  

 

Kula is a nationally ranked triathlete, as well as involved with her school’s swim team and as a member of the Student Athletic Leadership team. She also built her own business, Paws for a Cause. 

 

Dorsey Scholars are academic leaders and role models on campus at McDaniel. They also have distinctive opportunities, including serving as ambassadors of the College. Students do not apply for the award but are chosen from the Honors applicant pool. Kula is one of five incoming freshmen for the Class of 2024 awarded a Dorsey Scholarship. 

 

The Dorsey Scholars Program is supported by a $6.7 million estate gift from 1891 alumnus Philip Henry Dorsey, the largest bequest for scholarships in McDaniel’s history. 

 

For more information about McDaniel College’s Dorsey Scholars Program, visit www.mcdaniel.edu/dorsey-scholars. 

 

Visit www.mcdaniel.edu for more information about the college.